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Car Engine Oil Guide

All The Oil Information You Need In One Place

Selecting the correct oil for your vehicle can be a bit of a mine field. Some basic understanding of what the specifications are, and what the numbers printed on the can mean will be a help to selecting the correct oil.

Just about all modern vehicles use a multigrade oil, so what does it all mean?

If you see an expression such as 10W-40, the oil is a multigrade. This simply means that the oil falls into two viscosity grades, in this case 10W & 40. This is made possible by the inclusion of a polymer, a component which slows down the rate of thinning as the oil warms up and slows down the rate of thickening as the oil cools down. It was first developed some 50 years ago to avoid the routine of using a thinner oil in winter and a thicker oil in summer.

For a 10W-40 to attain the specification target a 10W (W = winter) the oil must have a certain maximum viscosity at low temperature. The actual viscosity and the temperature vary with the viscosity grade but in all cases the lower the number, the thinner the oil, e.g. a 5W oil is thinner than a 10W oil at temperatures encountered in UK winter conditions. This is important because a thinner oil will circulate faster on cold start, affording better engine protection.

For a 10W-40 to attain the other specification target SAE 40 the oil must fall within certain limits at 100 degC. In this case the temperature target does not vary with the viscosity grade, if there is no “W”, the measuring temperature is always 100degC. Again the lower the number the thinner the oil, a 30 oil is thinner than a 40 oil at 100 degC, which is typical of maximum bulk oil temperatures in an operating engine.

Duckhams Has Officially Launched at Opie Oils


After an absence of nearly 15 years, the much loved oil brand, made famous by its distinctive green hue, is back – and it’s available right here at Opie Oils!

Duckhams is well known and respected by classic car enthusiasts for it’s high quality motor oils. In fact many of the manufacturers that built the classic cars of today actually recommended Duckhams lubricants for their engines and drivelines.

 

A Brief History of Duckhams

Alexander Duckham was an English chemist and businessman who in 1899 founded Alexander Duckham & Co. He dedicated his life to solving technological problems relating to lubrication and produced the first multigrade oil for motorists; and soon Duckhams was regarded the largest independent lubrication oil company in the UK.

The Full Duckhams Range Available at Opie Oils

Opie Oils are pleased to announce that they are now suppliers of the full range of Duckhams including: Classic, QS, QXR & HyperGrade Plus.

In 1951 the decision was made that the multigrade oil was the oil of the future. The famous Q20-50, with its distinctive green colour, could be used universally in all forms of transport and motorsport. Today, by combining the experience of over 110 years of oil production with modern blending technology, every green drop of Duckhams Oil will give your classic engine extra protection, in all conditions, helping you keep your cherished classic running beautifully.

ACF-50 For Your Motorcycle

Learn how and why ACF-50 differs from (and improves on) the common multi-use spray

Plenty of motorcyclists use WD-40 or similar to try to protect their machines against dirt and road salts, the problem with this is that most aren’t waterproof, so will wash off at the first sign of rain. ACF-50 is different, read on to find out why you should be using this unique product on your pride and joy.

WD-40 – A WORKSHOP ESSENTIAL

Learn all about WD-40 – including what it is, what it is used for, and some fun facts

Multi-purpose sprays are found everywhere, from professional vehicle workshops, to home DIY’ers and mechanics. There are many brands and products so how do you know which to buy? Here we explain why you should definitely have a can of WD-40 in your home.

WD-40

TEXACO HAVOLINE HAS LANDED!

Launched back in 1904, Havoline engineers set out a task of inventing an exclusive filtration process that helped rid the oil of waxy engine oil caused by cold weather.

As refining advanced, so did additive technologies. In 1946, Havoline introduced its “New and Improved Havoline Motor Oil” which for the first time featured additives that inhibited corrosion, provided detergent and dispersive action, reduced piston ring wear at both low and high temperatures, and protected against engine rust. These innovations have continued, year after year, and rigorous field tests have proven time and again that Havoline engine oils offer unbeaten performance.